A New Channel and A New Series!

Well it’s been a long time coming, but here finally is the first episode of my new History Series! I’ve been busy adapting not only some of my older history articles, but some brand new content that I hope to release on a new channel that I’ve set up specifically for history videos, documentary shorts and other video-essay style content.  Seanachas is still pretty basic until I finish my artwork, headers and consistent thumbnails, but it’s a start! You can see my first video- The First Smoking Ban in History below!

For this the pilot I figured I would try to adapt an existing article I had already written, namely Pope Urban VII: The Shortest Smoking Ban in History as I felt the content and was pretty strong and would make a good 5-7 minute video. You can definitely expect ‘original’ content not featured on the site in the future, but certainly the next episodes will be based on another in my history series that I’ve previously written. This episode was made on a shorter timescale and with more limited resources (namely my laptop tablet rather than PC & Drawing tablet) so I’m hoping future videos will feature a lot more original drawings and content, but I still think it worked out pretty damn well!

Why Seanachas? Well I was playing around with possible channel names for months for something good that covered everything I wanted to do, but the problem was that I didn’t want to limit my channel to just history videos- I hope to feature everything from essays and videos on games, movies, books and other things that interest me, so I needed something that didn’t conform to just history. I picked Seanachas because 1. it’s a Gaelic word for someone who pretty much talks a lot, and 2. I like the sound of it, which is pretty neat.

Now, in the past I’ve mentioned a podcast, rather than videos or content specifically written for a video format, and that is coming! Basically, I have two plans- a podcast series that runs anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, and these short, fast paced videos that are much lighter on in-depth content in more ‘trivia’ based. When the podcast will be ready… I can’t say. It takes much longer to script and record, but I think I’ll judge it based on the reception of these videos first. Either way, I hope you enjoy the video and please, let me know what you think!

 

Pope Urban VII: The Shortest Smoking Ban in History

 

The earliest depiction of a European man smoking, from Tabacco by Anthony Chute.

The earliest depiction of a European man smoking, from Tabacco by Anthony Chute.

424 years ago today, on the 27th of September 1590 there came to pass two new of records in history. It marked the end of what would be the shortest Papal reign in history, and it also marked the end of probably the shortest and earliest smoking bans in history. Giovanni Battista Castagna, before taking his more street-friendly rap name of Pope Urban VII, was the shortest serving pope in history, having the job a mere 13 days in total, from his appointment on the 15th of September 1590 until his death due to malaria 424 years ago today. A man of considerable esteem and renown for his piety and learning, his sudden death was no doubt considered as sad to his subjects as his appointment to Pope was jubilant- in only his short stay as the moderator of the Vatican and Catholic faith he achieved a lot, especially considered he was stuck down with the illness that would kill him on a couple of days after being appointed. One of his first acts was “to have a list made of all the poor in Rome that he might alleviate their needs”, not an easy task considering the population of Rome would have been roughly 90,000 at the time. After what probably amounted to a heck of a lot of list-related writers cramp, he ordered the bakers of Rome to make “larger loaves of bread and sell them cheaper”, mitigating their losses out of his own purse. Not done with his campaign of poverty-busting, he instigated the construction of public works around the city of Rome to provide jobs to those who didn’t have any. A strong opponent of nepotism, he forbade relatives from getting jobs in the curia (Roman courts and assemblies), paid off debts owed by the papacy and raised the wages of cardinals who received insufficient pay all out of his own pocket. Possibly the most progressive and modern order set down by our short-stay Pope however, was a ban on a pastime that had come to take over 16th century Europe. According to Jack E. Henningfield’s book An Old-Fashioned Addiction, Urban takes the number one spot for:

“the world’s first known public smoking ban in 1590, as [Pope Urban] threatened to excommunicate anyone who ‘took tobacco in the porchway of or inside a church, whether it be by chewing it, smoking it with a pipe, or sniffing it in powdered form through the nose’

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