14 Common Phrases and their Nautical Origins

In case you guys missed it, I started a new channel! It’s all bout history videos and the like, and this week is 14 common phrases and their nautical origins, all in time for the anniversary of a first in American Naval history! The video is below, as is the full script and lovely links to all the sources! Enjoy!


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A New Channel and A New Series!

Well it’s been a long time coming, but here finally is the first episode of my new History Series! I’ve been busy adapting not only some of my older history articles, but some brand new content that I hope to release on a new channel that I’ve set up specifically for history videos, documentary shorts and other video-essay style content.  Seanachas is still pretty basic until I finish my artwork, headers and consistent thumbnails, but it’s a start! You can see my first video- The First Smoking Ban in History below!

For this the pilot I figured I would try to adapt an existing article I had already written, namely Pope Urban VII: The Shortest Smoking Ban in History as I felt the content and was pretty strong and would make a good 5-7 minute video. You can definitely expect ‘original’ content not featured on the site in the future, but certainly the next episodes will be based on another in my history series that I’ve previously written. This episode was made on a shorter timescale and with more limited resources (namely my laptop tablet rather than PC & Drawing tablet) so I’m hoping future videos will feature a lot more original drawings and content, but I still think it worked out pretty damn well!

Why Seanachas? Well I was playing around with possible channel names for months for something good that covered everything I wanted to do, but the problem was that I didn’t want to limit my channel to just history videos- I hope to feature everything from essays and videos on games, movies, books and other things that interest me, so I needed something that didn’t conform to just history. I picked Seanachas because 1. it’s a Gaelic word for someone who pretty much talks a lot, and 2. I like the sound of it, which is pretty neat.

Now, in the past I’ve mentioned a podcast, rather than videos or content specifically written for a video format, and that is coming! Basically, I have two plans- a podcast series that runs anywhere from 20 minutes to an hour, and these short, fast paced videos that are much lighter on in-depth content in more ‘trivia’ based. When the podcast will be ready… I can’t say. It takes much longer to script and record, but I think I’ll judge it based on the reception of these videos first. Either way, I hope you enjoy the video and please, let me know what you think!

 

Sunday Night Sketchbook 15/03/15

Now, you probably don’t remember this, but many, many centuries ago in the mists of time… I used to post art to this blog! Yes, yes hold your gasps, it’s not always been just weird rants on punctuation, games and British TV series, no I used to actually draw stuff, then post it here. In fact it was the purpose of this blog! Okay okay I’ll stop./ Sorry for the delay, I was meaning to post this when I finally drew some stuff that was actually uuuh… worthwhile and I forgot! But hold onta ya butts, here comes a Sunday Night Sketchbook that’ll blow the peach fuzz off your lips! Here we go!

When I watch a Millbee Stream and I'm on Acid like

When I watch a Millbee Stream and I’m on Acid like

SonmicaLP, chasing Dibzcraft down some stairs with a rose. I hope this can explain it

SonmicaLP, chasing Dibzcraft down some stairs with a rose. I hope this can explain it

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Broadchurch- All Go in Final Minutes

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One of my favourite series of the past few years has been Broadchurch, a captivating and incredibly well acted television drama which in the first season centered around the murder of an 11 year old boy, Danny Latimer, in the fictional Dorset town of Broadchurch and the efforts of David Tennant (Detective Alec Hardy) and Olivia Coleman’s (Detective Sergeant Ellie Miller) characters in catching the killer as well as the wider impact of the families involved and people of the community, each a suspect themselves. The second season has just finished up last night, this one focusing on the conviction of Danny’s murderer and the resolution of the infamous unsolved case that ruined Alec’s career and brough him to the town of Broadchurch in the first place and turned him into such the moody, destitute and pretty unwell person we met in the first ever episode (though how much of those traits can be attributed to him just being Scottish is unclear). It was a great ride, but did anyone feel it slightly rushed in that final episode?

(some spoilers ahead!)

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Life is Strange, Its Mechanics Stranger

Life is Strange Episode 1 Spoilers Ahead.

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A lot has been said about Life is Strange, the new point-and-click episodic adventure game by not Telltale Games, who currently run what is probably the largest game-genre monopoly in history, but rather by Dontnod Entertainment, makers of 2013’s Remember Me. As many have pointed out, some aspects of the writing leaves a lot to be desired. Many of the characters are walking clichés, there is some god awful “down with the kids” conversations that just do not work. It also has some very… odd lip-syncing issues. Despite this however, it does do a lot right: interfaces, presentation, a good value for money episode that doesn’t make you feel slightly cheated (cough cough The Wolf Among Us) or drags on too much. And I’ve enjoyed it too- I’m doing a Let’s Play of it on my channel, and as a big fan of both Point and click-style adventure games to more artistic works like Gone Home and Dear Esther, it’s a very welcome breath of fresh air in a market that was starting feeling slightly stale from an overload of Telltale products (I love you guys, really, but I’m beginning to feel a very definite air of derivativeness recently).

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“If only there was some law enforcement agency I could inform! Drat!”

The problem I have with Life is Strange, however, is a pretty big one. A pretty big, glaring gameplay mechanic that I feel simply doesn’t fit within the context of the story or game: time travel. Yes, our main character Max discovers during a pretty out-of-place school shooting (seriously, our main character should have maybe put more thought or worry into the fact that someone in her school is carrying about a loaded gun other than just maybe giving the headteacher a quick tip-off), that she has the ability to turn back time. This is essentially the main mechanic of LiS. You explore the environment, interact with people and make decisions like any other point and click. The difference, however, is that you can immediately undo each option with a  quick rewind. It makes for some novel puzzles here and there, but it leaves me with two big gripes. Continue reading

How I Stopped Worrying and Learned I Could Care Less about Couldn’t Caring Less

I’m a big David Mitchell fan, he’s a great actor, speaker, has an amazing a sense of humor and his writing is bloomin’ brilliant. I also loved his video podcast series David Mitchell’s Soapbox, which started all the way back in the forgotten mists of 2009. Now David has dozens of brilliant episodes of Soapbox, but arguably his most famous episode is one you’ve probably seen trotted out across the internet in one form or another- Dear America…, in which he discusses in classic Mitchell style, among other things, the nonsensical phrase “I could care less”.

Fine, right? Great! Funny. A nice side-line two-minute video to make you laugh. Not as good as some of his other episodes, but a classic nonetheless. Maybe, however, could we stop talking about this possibly incorrect use of a phrase as if it’s some kind of deadly virus that needs to be knocked out before we all succumb to the horrors of using idioms that are factually inaccurate? “What do you mean ‘why am I feeling blue’?! That’s a colour not a feeling, get him! Burn the witch!”

"Ugh okay okay, I get it fewer then not less than!"

“Ugh I get it- fewer than, not less than!”

This is nothing against David Mitchell, who merely pointed out this interesting development of a phrase for comic effect. No, the problem I have is with the hordes of internet and grammar aficionados/know-it-alls that use this video as some irrefutable logic bomb, and insist that this injustice in speech needs to be pointed out at every available opportunity as an example of either the English language going to the dogs (see: Eats, shoots and Leaves), or America being a bunch of dummies who say stuff they don’t understand (see: edgy teenagers). I think this also falls into the larger category of people co-opting someone’s opinion as fact, and that will point to something like Louis CK’s or Chris Rock’s stand-up-routines as a reason or justification that we should all be allowed to use gay slurs or the n-word because “It’s just language! I don’t mean it to be offensive! It’s your fault if you’re offended!”.

So where does “I could care less” actually come from anyway? Well, we don’t know for sure. It’s impossible, really, to pin down the first usage of the phrase and there are various theories. Dictionary.com rightfully points out that the phrase is an idiom, and guess what? Idioms don’t have to make logical sense:

“In English, along with other languages, idioms are not required to follow logic, and to point out the lack of logic in one idiom and not all idioms is…illogical.”

Similarly, the first recorded usage of “I couldn’t care less” only precedes “I could care less” by around 10 years. Although the Dictionary.com article refutes it, the best theory I’ve heard of the phrases etymology is that it originated from Yiddish adoption of the term. Yiddish speakers dropped the negative couldn’t as part of pattern of self-deprecating/sarcastic phrasing that is common in Yiddish heritage and New York Jewish speech. Just as how Yiddish communities popularized the phrase “I should be so lucky!” (which actually tends to mean “I have no hope of being so lucky!”), “I could care less!” sort of follows that sort of delivery and speech pattern when presented that way.
Another phrase that is more generally American is “Tell me about it!” which really means “Don’t tell me about it, because I know all about it already” but follows this sarcastic style.

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Again, There’s no actual documented evidence of this, but I always liked that explanation as it felt like the most believable and understandable to me, (mainly because when you say it in the voice of a plucky sarcastic rabbi from New York, it doesn’t sound nearly as out-of-place).

So maybe let’s just accept I could care less for what it is: an idiom that doesn’t really have to make sense in any way, and just another example of how cool and evolutionary the use of English is without having to point it out as wrong at every available opportunity. Maybe, in fact, we should look at what is probably the best episode of Soapbox, in which David’s friend and co-writer Robert Webb comes on to quite rightfully point out the hypocrisy and generally nit-picky nature in many of Mitchell’s arguments. At the end of the day, David’s arguments are funny. They’re well presented, well-research and most of the time technically correct, but that doesn’t make it undeniably right, and it certainly doesn’t make it a crutch for you to then go and beat every person with who wants to use a phrase of speech differently than you online or in real life. In the end, can’t we all just get along?